866-582-9596

Greenville/Spartanburg

110A Aztec Ct Duncan, SC 29334 Phone: 864-233-6700 Fax: 864-233-6799 Phone: 864-582-9596 Fax: 864-582-9597

Charleston

4042 Ashley Phosphate Rd North Charleston, SC 29418 Phone: 843-767-3344 Fax: 843-767-8844

Myrtle Beach

1406 Commerce Place, Suite J Myrtle Beach, SC 29577 Phone: 843-839-5101 Fax: 843-839-5103

Beaufort

1180 Ribaut Rd. Suite 2 Beaufort, SC 29902 Phone: 843-379-0612 Fax: 843-379-0613

Columbia

1401 St. Andrews Road, Suite 150 Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: 803-282-9700 Fax: 803-828-7433

Savannah

4821 Waters Avenue Savannah, GA 31404 Phone: 912-355-3446 Fax: 912-355-3447
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Health Issues

Parkinson's Disease Living Your Life

If you've received a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, you'll need to work closely with your doctor to find a treatment plan that offers you the greatest relief from symptoms with the fewest side effects. Certain lifestyle changes also may help make living with Parkinson's disease easier. 

Healthy eating
Eat a nutritionally balanced diet that contains plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. These foods are high in fiber, which is important for helping prevent the constipation that is common in Parkinson's disease.

If you take a fiber supplement, such as psyllium powder, Metamucil or Citrucel, be sure to introduce it gradually and drink plenty of fluids daily. Otherwise, your constipation may become worse. If you find that fiber helps your symptoms, use it on a regular basis for the best results.

Walking with care
Parkinson's disease can disturb your sense of balance, making it difficult to walk with a normal gait. These suggestions may help:

  • Try not to move too quickly.
  • Aim for your heel to strike the floor first when you're walking.
  • If you notice yourself shuffling, stop and check your posture. It's best to stand up straight with your head over your hips and your feet eight to 10 inches apart.

Avoiding falls
In the later stages of the disease, you may fall more easily. That's because Parkinson's disease affects the balance and coordination centers in the brain. In fact, you may be thrown off balance by just a small push or bump. The following suggestions may help:

  • Don't pivot your body over your feet while turning. Instead, make a U-turn.
  • Don't lean or reach. Keep your center of gravity over your feet.
  • Don't carry things while walking.
  • Avoid walking backward.

Dressing
Dressing can be the most frustrating of all activities for someone with Parkinson's disease. The loss of fine-motor control makes it hard to button and zip clothes, and even to step into a pair of pants. An occupational therapist can point out techniques that make daily activities easier. These suggestions also may help:

  • Allow plenty of time so that you don't feel rushed.
  • Lay clothes nearby.
  • Choose clothes that you can slip on easily, such as sweat pants, simple dresses or pants with elastic waistbands.
  • Use fabric fasteners, such as Velcro, instead of buttons